september 2016

2 videos
13 images

fires ancient

martin firrell

Flames engulfed the South and East faces of the dome in a 180 degree projection created from three different projection points.

The work aimed to create a visual 'echo' of the fire that destroyed the previous cathedral building and produced the conditions for Wren's masterpiece to rise from the ashes.

Fires Ancient referenced both the beauty and the destructive power of fire, and the creative potential released by trauma.

Without the Great Fire of London, there would be no modern London and as we understand it, and Wren's beautiful and iconic cathedral building would not exist.
the social equality and inclusion that characterises modern-day London.

Text and fire were projected onto the flytower of the National Theatre exploring black history, the history of the women's movement, the struggle against racism and milestones in the journey towards equality for LGBT+ people.

Fires Ancient presented fire on the dome of St Paul's in waves of colour consistent with flame of increasing temperatures (from dull orange to yellow to blue to brilliant white).

The flames were also intended to be suggestive of both antiquity and the rich brocades associated with ecclesiastical tradition.
Fires Ancient was commissioned by Artichoke for London's Burning, the festival of arts and ideas at the centre of Great Fire 350, the City of London's commemoration of the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London in 1666.

With Fires Modern (simultaneously projected onto the flytower of the National Theatre), Fires Ancient formed a diptich responding to the threat, beauty, and possibilities of fire. Both projections appeared nightly from dusk to 11pm from the 1st to the 4th september 2016.

Fires Modern explored the history of the progressive movement from 1666 to the present day - those metaphorical fires that gave rise to

st paul's cathedral london

st paul's cathedral london

september 2016

fires ancient

martin firrell

2 videos
13 images